Bluey kids’ series shows off Brisbane life and animation expertise to the world


Posted

October 07, 2018 09:00:00

A new children’s animation created entirely in Brisbane is embracing all that is good about the Sunshine State, using its weather and places as a background for the authentic Aussie series.

Bluey, inspired by the warm setting of tropical Queensland, follows a Blue Heeler pup who lives with her dad (an archaeologist) and mum (who works at the airport), along with her four-year-old sister.

Emmy Award-winning creative house Ludo Studios produced the series in South Brisbane, employing first-year students from QUT and Griffith University.

The local graduates made up more than half of the project’s workforce.

Bluey is recognisably Brisbane

Executive producer Daley Pearson said it was rare to have an animation entirely written, created and produced in Brisbane.

“Having it set in Brisbane enables people to recognise Red Hill, the Queenslanders (houses), New Farm Park and the CityCat,” he said.

“If you’re a fan of Brisbane bands too, you’ll recognise Dave McCormack from the band Custard who voices the dad in the show.”

Working with local expertise

The 52-episode series aired for the first time this week.

Mr Pearson said the animation created opportunities that many animators would otherwise have had to travel overseas to get.

“The whole series took about two years, and that’s with 40 animators, and most of them were first-years, as well as some experts from around the world who worked with us here,” Mr Pearson said.

“Some of them worked on Peppa Pig and Charlie and Lola and shows like that.”

Each episode took approximately four months to put together.

“To give you an idea, there was one scene where Bluey and Bingo knock over blocks — it was a three-second shot and it took one of our artists two days to create,” Mr Pearson said.

The ABC and BBC collaboration was created by Brisbane father Joe Brumm and has created waves internationally.

“We’ve already had other offers from some amazing people from overseas and hopefully they won’t change the Australian accent,” Mr Pearson said.

“We’ve seen enough American stuff; I think we should be able to keep our accents.”

Mr Pearson said although the program was aimed at pre-schoolers, there was something in the show for everyone.

“It’s a beautiful show made by beautiful artists and we’re getting some amazing feedback on the show already.

“That stuff is oxygen to a show like this.

“Seeing everyone’s years of hard work up on the screen was amazing.”

BBC Worldwide have the global merchandise and licensing distribution rights for the series, which is airing on ABC KIDS and ABC KIDS iView.

Topics:

animation,

arts-and-entertainment,

human-interest,

children,

television,

brisbane-4000



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