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Kim Jong-un and Moon Jae-in meet in Pyongyang for high-stakes summit

<br><div> <!--endnoindex--> <p class="published"> Updated <span class="timestamp"> September 18, 2018 13:46:00 </span> </p> <p>North Korean leader Kim Jong-un greeted Moon Jae-in with hugs and smiles as the South Korean President arrived in Pyongyang for a third summit between the two, aimed at advancing faltering nuclear talks and officially ending the Korean War.</p><div class="inline-content wysiwyg right"> <div class="inner"> <h2>Key points:</h2><ul><li>Hundreds of North Koreans wave and cheer as Moon Jae-in arrives</li><li>Two leaders looking to make progress on denuclearisation</li><li>Third meeting between Moon Jae-in and Kim Jong-un</li></ul></div> </div><p>Hundreds of North Koreans wearing suits and traditional dresses also greeted Mr Moon, carrying flowers and waving national and unification flags.</p><p>A sign behind them read: "We ardently welcome President Moon Jae-in's visit to Pyongyang!"</p><p>Amid the pomp and smiles, Mr Moon will be looking to settle some lofty goals, including resolving deadlocked nuclear diplomacy, easing a military standoff and promoting peace on a peninsula many feared was close to war last year.</p><p>Mr Moon said ahead of his trip that he would push for "irreversible, permanent peace" and for better dialogue between Pyongyang and Washington during "heart-to-heart" talks with Mr Kim.</p><p>Mr Moon's chief of staff, however, played down the chance that Mr Moon's summit with Mr Kim would produce major progress in nuclear diplomacy.</p><p>The plane carrying Mr Moon left Seoul on Tuesday morning and flew in an indirect route off the west coast of the peninsula before turning inland and arriving at Pyongyang's Sunan International Airport about 80 minutes later, Mr Moon's office said.</p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-18/moon-jae-in-and-kim-jong-un-hug/10263646"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10263590-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="People watch a televised broadcast in Seoul as Moon Jae-in and Kim Jong-un hug as they meet in Pyongyang." title="Moon Jae-in and Kim Jong-un hug" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-18/moon-jae-in-and-kim-jong-un-hug/10263646" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> People watch the televised broadcast in Seoul of the Korean leaders meeting in Pyongyang. <span class="source">(Reuters: Kim Hong-Ji)</span> </a></div><p>About 150 business, entertainment and sports leaders streamed onto the aircraft before it departed.</p><p>Mr Moon and his wife, Kim Jung-sook, were greeted by Mr Kim and his wife, Ri Sol-ju.</p><p>The North Korean leader then led his guests to meet some of his senior officials, and they exchanged mutual greetings.</p><p>As a military band played a rousing march, hundreds of North Koreans, lined up in neat rows and dressed in black suits and traditional hanboks, cheered and waved bouquets of artificial flowers, the North Korean flag and a white-and-blue flag with a map symbolising a unified Korean Peninsula.</p><p>North Korean soldiers and naval troops quick-marched into position to welcome Mr Moon, and the two leaders inspected the honour guard.</p><p>Since taking office in May last year, Mr Moon has met Mr Kim twice at the Koreas' shared border village of Panmunjom.</p><p>His Pyongyang trip makes him the third South Korean leader to visit North Korea's capital for an inter-Korean summit since the peninsula was divided into a Soviet-backed North and US-backed South at the end of World War II in 1945.</p><p>Mr Moon and Mr Kim are both pushing a reluctant Washington to sign off on formally ending the war with a peace treaty.</p><p><strong>Reuters/AP</strong></p> <p class="topics"> <strong>Topics:</strong> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/world-politics">world-politics</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/unrest-conflict-and-war">unrest-conflict-and-war</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/foreign-affairs">foreign-affairs</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/korea-democratic-peoples-republic-of">korea-democratic-peoples-republic-of</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/korea-republic-of">korea-republic-of</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/asia">asia</a> </p> <p class="published"> First posted <span class="timestamp"> September 18, 2018 13:21:19 </span> </p> <!--noindex--> </div> <br> <br><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-18/kim-jong-un-moon-jae-in-meet-for-high-stakes-summit/10263310">Source link </a>

How Australia's Justice Michael Kirby helped India's first openly gay prince combat sex ban

<br><div> <!--endnoindex--> <p> By Gary Nunn</p> <p class="published"> Updated <span class="timestamp"> September 18, 2018 14:07:30 </span> </p> <div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-01-23/indian-prince-manvendra-singh-gohil-4/9354116"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/9354094-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Indian prince Manvendra Singh Gohil is openly gay." title="Indian prince Manvendra Singh Gohil 4" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-01-23/indian-prince-manvendra-singh-gohil-4/9354116" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Manvendra Singh Gohil recently announced plans to open his palace as a community centre for LGBT people. <span class="source">(Facebook: Manvendra Singh Gohil)</span> </a></div> <p>The recent <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-06/indias-gay-sex-ban-struck-down-by-court/10210064" target="_self" title="">unanimous ruling by India's Supreme Court to decriminalise gay sex</a> in a country of 1.3 billion people was particularly poignant for one man.</p><div class="inline-content right"> <a href="https://twitter.com/ANI/status/1037597412838141952"><span><strong>External Link:</strong> India celebrations video</span> </a></div><p>Prince Manvendra Singh Gohil, 52, heir to the throne of Rajpipla in western Gujarat state, is <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-01-23/openly-gay-indian-prince-calls-for-reforms-to-anti-lgbt-law/9353596" target="_self" title="">India's openly gay prince</a>. He campaigned tirelessly — often at personal cost — to repeal Section 377, a 160-year-old British colonial law.</p><p>When the prince came out as gay, his parents disowned him. His dad disinherited him and he was kicked out of the palace. His mum took out a newspaper advertisement encouraging the state to ostracise him. Effigies of him were burnt in the streets.</p><p>But today, he couldn't be happier. To celebrate, he "hugged all my Foundation staff" — LGBTQI charity the <a href="http://www.lakshyatrust.com/">Lakshya Trust</a>. "We'd ordered a cake with '377' on it. We crossed that out, cut the cake and danced!"</p><p>As I congratulate him, I confess I've never before spoken to a prince and ask how to address him — "Your Highness" is the response, but it's the only time there's even the faintest semblance of haughtiness.</p><h2>'For 4 short years, we experienced freedom in India'</h2><p>Prince Manvendra was instrumental in the initial Delhi High Court judgement of 2009, which decriminalised gay sex.</p><p>But this was overturned in 2013 by the Supreme Court. "For those four short years, LGBTQI people experienced freedom in India," he says.</p><p>The prince realised he needed to ramp up his campaigning — and to inspire him to do that, he drew upon advice given to him by an Australian expert: Justice Michael Kirby.</p><p>"His contribution towards the verdict in India helped LGBTQI people get our ultimate freedom," the prince says.</p><h2>'Leading example' of what LGBTQI people can contribute</h2><p>Prince Manvendra realised he had much in common with Australia's longest-serving judge, who requested to meet the Prince.</p><p>"I'm first gay Prince and he was the first [openly] gay judge," Prince Manvendra says. "When we met, it was exciting to share our historic coming out experiences. </p><p>"But I also knew his global judicial advocacy would be very helpful for India."</p><p>The pair first met a temple in Mumbai.</p><p>"I'd read about Prince Manvendra," says Justice Kirby. "His courageousness to not masquerade his sexuality, despite family difficulties, is a leading example of what LGBTQI people can contribute to a diverse, multi-faith society.</p><p>"He's not just focused on himself, but on the ordinary Indian citizens."</p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-17/michael-kirby-former-high-court-justice-august-26,-2016.jpg/10221632"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/7789040-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Michael Kirby, former High Court justice." title="Michael Kirby former High Court justice August 26, 2016." width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-17/michael-kirby-former-high-court-justice-august-26,-2016.jpg/10221632" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Michael Kirby, former High Court justice, photographed at ABC Perth. (file image) <span class="source">(720 ABC Perth: Emma Wynne)</span> </a></div><p>The admiration was mutual.</p><p>"I was very humbled he travelled by local train to see me," says Prince Manvendra.</p><p>Whilst bumping along in a tuk tuk to the "unusual temple", Justice Kirby offered some pearls of advice.</p><p>"He told me: 'You're from a royal family, you have power and influence over people in society'," says Prince Manvendra.</p><p>"You're the best person to do this advocacy — which I did — with lawyers, medical practitioners, educational institutions, media and politicians."</p><h2>Australian influence on Indian law</h2><p>The prince says Justice Kirby's advocacy in India has had a lasting impact.</p><p>"Someone of his background can really influence people. He met our party leaders [to discuss repealing Section 377] — that in itself takes courage and commitment."</p><p>Justice Kirby returned from India a fortnight ago having received an honorary degree from the National Law School of India Odisha, conferred by India's Chief Justice.</p><p>"In my acceptance speech, I mentioned the need to return to the [2009] wisdom of the Delhi High Court," Justice Kirby says.</p><p>"So I'm delighted that has now happened."</p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-17/prince-onstage-with-microphone/10222626"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10221466-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Prince onstage with microphone" title="Prince onstage with microphone" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-17/prince-onstage-with-microphone/10222626" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Prince Manvendra has tirelessly campaigned for LGBTQI rights in India. <span class="source">(Supplied)</span> </a></div><h2>'I had no relationship with my mother'</h2><p>As a child, Prince Manvendra had a "22-man army" of servants. But he wasn't allowed to go to bars or parties beyond the palace, or make friends outside of his "warrior" caste. Entire palaces were split by gender. His companions were his boy servants.</p><p>Affection from his biological mother was rare. </p><p>"I think it happens in most royal families. They give birth to you and then the servants take over. I had no relationship with my mother — I thought my nanny was my actual mother for years."</p><p>Aged 25, he entered into an arranged marriage which ended after 15 months. His ex-wife re-married and "seems happy" now, although they're not in touch. </p><p>One of the objectives of his Foundation is to support women whose husbands come out: "They often get forgotten," he says.</p><p>The given reason for divorce was impotency. "It's a common misconception in India that gay men are just impotent men," he says.</p><p>His mother rebuffed the blight to the family's reputation by making him undergo a medical test, which "proved" he wasn't impotent.</p><p>He describes the effigy burning when he came out as "very hurtful."</p><p>"The same people who'd kissed my feet, treated me like a God, were calling for me to be stripped of my title," he says.</p><p>"My ancestors have been respected for centuries for what they did for the Princely state — I'm very proud of that; I didn't want to bring shame on them. </p><p>"I don't blame these people. I blame their ignorance — because in their place, I'd have done the same."</p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-17/prince-manvendra-close-up-portrait-in-elaborate-dress/10222628"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10221464-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Prince Manvendra close up portrait in elaborate dress" title="Prince Manvendra" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-17/prince-manvendra-close-up-portrait-in-elaborate-dress/10222628" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> When Prince Manvendra came out as gay, Indian people burned effigies of him in the streets. <span class="source">(Supplied)</span> </a></div><h2>Oprah appearance helped change attitudes</h2><p>A major turning point came when he was invited to <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6a39D0PtPM">tell his story on Oprah</a>.</p><p>"Oprah's very popular among Indians. They starting thinking, if she called me, there must be some substance to my fight. Attitudes started changing," he says. </p><p>He's since been on Oprah twice more — "I'm the only Indian to have been on Oprah three times."</p><p>In 2009, he joined British reality show The Undercover Princes, where three foreign princes were challenged to "live and date like normal people" in Brighton.</p><p>While he didn't find lasting love, he operated a washing machine and vacuum cleaner for the first time and went to his first gay bar.</p><p>He casually mentions that "Kim" invited him for lunch last year. That would be Kim Kardashian, for an episode of Keeping Up with the Kardashians<em>.</em></p><p>"India's youth population is the world's largest. And they love that program," he explains. </p><p>"If they can hear the Kardashian family relating their experience with Caitlyn Jenner to the social barriers of my coming out, we'd change future social attitudes to LGBT people in India, where most people think we're immoral or paedophiles."</p><p>His own sister — the Princess — initially warned people with kids to "stay away from gay people like him", but they've since reconciled and her son runs the prince's Instagram page.</p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-17/prince-with-men-in-drag/10222630"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10221472-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Prince with men in drag" title="Prince with men in drag" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-17/prince-with-men-in-drag/10222630" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Prince Manvendra is opening a hostel on his palace grounds for LGBT Indians. <span class="source">(Supplied)</span> </a></div><h2>Making his palace an LGBT haven</h2><p>In January, the prince announced he would transform his palace into an LGBT shelter, throwing open its doors to LGBTQI people shunned by their family like he was.</p><p>"I knew [the Supreme court judgment] would result in many gay people coming out, then being rejected by their families, sacked from their jobs, socially boycotted, rendered homeless," he says.</p><p>"I'm fortunate — I have a huge 15 acre royal estate which my father, the maharaja, has gifted me, after getting educated about LGBTQI issues. He is the kind of essential straight ally we need."</p><p>The LGBT shelter on the palace grounds will be completed in mid 2019 — the prince is just fundraising for the finishing touches. It'll host 25 LGBTQI people who've been ostracised.</p><p>Only one person still isn't happy: the prince's mother.</p><p>"She initially threatened to stop government funding to my Foundation [for HIV awareness], saying it was doing immoral work," he explains.</p><p>"She hates my dad because he supports me. She asks him why he gave me back the royal estate to start 'some centre for these homos.'"</p><p>"But she can't do anything to get it back now or stop what I'm determined to do to help these people. I joke that even though she's the queen, I'm the bigger queen!"</p><p><strong>Gary Nunn is a freelance writer. Twitter: <a href="https://twitter.com/GaryNunn1?lang=en">@garynunn1</a></strong></p> <p class="topics"> <strong>Topics:</strong> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/community-and-society">community-and-society</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/people">people</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/human-interest">human-interest</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/gays-and-lesbians">gays-and-lesbians</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/india">india</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/australia">australia</a> </p> <p class="published"> First posted <span class="timestamp"> September 18, 2018 05:00:00 </span> </p> <!--noindex--> </div><script async src="http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <br> <br><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-18/gay-sex-ban-india-prince-manvendra-michael-kirby/10221328">Source link </a>

Inmate Jamie McCrossen's father shakes son's hand during court bid for freedom, wipes away tears

<br><div> <!--endnoindex--> <p class="published"> Posted <span class="timestamp"> September 18, 2018 14:09:46 </span> </p> <div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-18/risdon-prison.jpg/10263464"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/9881888-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Looking down on Risdon Prison." title="Risdon Prison in Hobart" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-18/risdon-prison.jpg/10263464" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> McCrossen has been held in the Risdon Prison complex for 28 years. <span class="source">(ABC News: David Hudspeth)</span> </a></div> <p>One of the Tasmania's longest serving prisoners has shaken his father's hand and told him on the witness stand that he loves him.</p><p>Jamie Gregory McCrossen, 46, was a declared dangerous criminal, which means he can be locked up indefinitely.</p><p>He is applying to have the tag removed so he can be freed.</p><p>McCrossen was 18 when he was locked up for holding up a shop with an antique pistol.</p><p>He was declared a dangerous criminal a year later after he wrote death threats to his victim from his cell.</p><p>McCrossen gave evidence four times during the two-day application. </p><p>The court heard that in the past two weeks he had also phoned his mother in Melbourne for the first time since 2011 and last night made his first-ever phone call to his father.</p><p>His father, Gregory McCrossen, was in court on Tuesday and Justice Wood adjourned the court for about half an hour to let the father and son spend time together. </p><p>McCrossen's father sat at the back of the court and appeared to wipe away tears after his son shook his hand and told the court on the stand that he loved him.</p><p>Gregory McCrossen also gave evidence on Tuesday saying that he viewed the phone call from his son as "a really positive effort".</p><blockquote class="quote--pullquote"><p>"I just want to let him know I'm here to support him in anyway I can," he told the court.</p></blockquote><p>"And when it's time for him to be released I'll be there to guide him and give him that family support."</p><p>McCrossen told Justice Helen Wood that while he had pleaded guilty to writing the death threat letters, he had not written them — someone else had.</p><div class="inline-content photo right"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-18/wilfred-lopes-cente,-risdon-prison,-hobart/10263466"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/9025134-3x2-340x227.jpg" alt="The courtyard of the Wilfred Lopes Centre in Risdon Prison" title="Wilfred Lopes Centre, Risdon Prison, Hobart" width="340" height="227"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-18/wilfred-lopes-cente,-risdon-prison,-hobart/10263466" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> The courtyard of the Wilfred Lopes Centre in Risdon Prison <span class="source">(Supplied: Department of Justice)</span> </a></div><p>He earlier told the court that while he knew he had done the wrong thing, others who had done far worse had got much lighter sentences.</p><p>McCrossen told Justice Wood that he was no danger and that he only had one life and wanted the chance to live it.</p><p>An earlier bid by McCrossen to have the tag lifted in 2016 was rejected because the court felt he was too institutionalised to fend for himself in the community.</p><p>Also, he had no plan in place about how he would deal with the pressures of finding accommodation and an income without returning to violence.</p><p>McCrossen has been treated in the Wilfred Lopes mental health unit at the Risdon Prison since last October.</p><p>The court heard that even if the dangerous criminal tag was lifted, it could be months or even years before McCrossen is well enough to be released from the facility or another similar mental health facility.</p><h2>Only a danger to himself: lawyer</h2><p>The court heard that before McCrossen was transferred from the general prison population to Wilfred Lopes, he was so ill that he was unable to talk, bathe himself or even make a bed.</p><p>His lawyer Kate Cuthbertson said the only danger McCrossen now posed was to himself, not the community. </p><p>The court heard McCrossen had begun to engage with his treatment over the past month and that psychologists had noticed that he now occasionally displayed a sense of hope about his future.</p><p>Two weeks ago he had his first outing into the community in 28 years, to lay flowers on the grave of his grandmother.</p><p>The court heard from psychologists and health professionals treating McCrossen that when he feels threatened or stressed his reaction is to withdraw rather than react violently.</p><p>Justice Wood has reserved her decision until October 4.</p><p>She thanked McCrossen for his "courage" in going through the process of applying to be free and for giving evidence.</p><p>In 2017, the <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-07-12/dump-indefinite-detention-for-dangerous-criminals-law-group-says/8702800" target="_self" title="">Tasmania Law Reform Institute released a research paper on the indefinite detention of dangerous criminals,</a> in which it was argued the legislation made it "almost impossible for any person who is held under this legislation to be released".</p> <p class="topics"> <strong>Topics:</strong> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/prisons-and-punishment">prisons-and-punishment</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/law-crime-and-justice">law-crime-and-justice</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/courts-and-trials">courts-and-trials</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/risdon-vale-7016">risdon-vale-7016</a> </p> <!--noindex--> </div> <br> <br><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-18/prisoner-jamie-mccrossen-shakes-hand-of-father-in-court/10262934">Source link </a>

Mental Health Clinician - Horsham Infant & Child

<br><div> Mental Health Clinician RPN3, P2, SW2, OT2 Horsham Infant and Child Mental Health Services Fixed Term - Full Time (Possibility of ongoing) An exciting opportunity exists for a motivated Mental Health Clinician to undertake an ongoing position on of the Infant and Child Mental Health Team based at Horsham. Ballarat Health Services – Ballarat Mental Health Services (BHS – BMHS) is a dynamic Area Mental Health Service striving to provide the highest standards of treatment for the local and surrounding communities, while maintaining a commitment to a continuously improving clinical environment. We are currently in the process of undergoing significant service reform with the active involvement and engagement of all staff in the service. This provides an opportunity to be involved in contributing to the development of an innovative, contemporary and person centred Mental Health Service. The service provides opportunity to further develop skills and knowledge, with a commitment to supporting ongoing professional development and supervision. Clinicians who undertake a career at BHS - BMHS will find the role is both challenging and rewarding, with exposure to a wide range of mental health disorders and treatments. Our clinicians develop comprehensive knowledge and expert skill in the provision of contemporary mental health treatment for clients and families, leading to many opportunities for career progression and advancement. Applications are sought from candidates interested in developing specialist clinical skills in the area of mental health treatments. This is a superb opportunity for you to develop your mental health career. If you want to work in a multi disciplinary team and provide evidence-based treatment to consumers and their families whilst working collaboratively with all services within Ballarat Health Services and the client’s community, we would be delighted to receive your application. For further enquiries please contact Kevin Harris on 5362 1300. A current Victorian Drivers Licence, Immunisation Clearance, Working with Children Check and Police Check are mandatory for this position. All applications must be submitted online. BHS is committed to providing a diverse and inclusive workforce. We encourage applications from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, people with disability, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, mature age workers and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people. </div> <br> <br><a href="http://jobviewtrack.com/en-au/job-1e4a4160480a1b0f4b766d0606150f0b456811090507420b7e4544080b6c6a114e17090d4e2f0041181c0171624e5c41590c6d2d4f1d4c0748290b0609541c695844131e091e2f555856134714/a2e413e106124b4364bebe181b6a93dd.html">APPLY NOW </a>

Barnaby Joyce sexual harassment allegation: Catherine Marriott speaks out | Australia news

<br><div itemprop="articleBody" data-test-id="article-review-body"> <p>Rural advocate Catherine Marriott has spoken out about her allegations of sexual harassment against former deputy prime minister <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/barnaby-joyce" data-link-name="auto-linked-tag" data-component="auto-linked-tag" class="u-underline">Barnaby Joyce</a>, saying she was “terrified” over what to do about the complaint.</p> <p>“He was a very popular Ag Minister at that time, and I didn’t … I was … I’m just a little human against a big system, and I was terrified,” Marriott told the 7.30 Report.</p> <p>Speaking publicly for the first time, Marriott has detailed what happened after the alleged incident, her confidential complaints to the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/national-party" data-link-name="auto-linked-tag" data-component="auto-linked-tag" class="u-underline">National party</a> and the effect of her public identification.</p> <p>The complaint was the last straw for the former deputy prime minister and Nationals leader Barnaby Joyce following his return to parliament in a byelection over dual citizenship and revelations of his affair with his press secretary Vikki Campion. <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/feb/23/barnaby-joyce-resigns-nationals-deputy-prime-minister-australia" data-link-name="in body link" class="u-underline">He resigned, citing harassment complaints</a> as the “straw that broke the camel’s back”.</p> <p>Marriott did not describe the incident in detail, saying she did not want to be defined by it but she struggled over whether to make a complaint.</p> <p>“[After the incident] I walked up to my hotel room and I burst into tears. I then couldn’t sleep that whole night. I didn’t actually sleep for a week.</p> <p>“I rang two of my closest friends and I told them what had happened, and they said they couldn’t believe … they were just absolutely shocked, and they said, ‘You can’t tell anyone. You cannot tell anyone … you will be destroyed if this comes out’.”</p> <p>Marriott considered her options as the #<a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/metoo-movement" data-link-name="in body link" class="u-underline">MeToo movement unfolded</a>, highlighting sexual harassment across a number of high profile industries. She also drew strength from the words of <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/jan/11/father-tells-of-bullying-after-suicide-of-akubra-girl-dolly-amy-everett" data-link-name="in body link" class="u-underline">14-year-old Dolly Everett</a>, who committed suicide after allegations of bullying.</p> <p>“She left the world with some really wise words, which were, ‘Speak even if your voice shakes’. And that cut me to the core,” Marriot said.</p> <p>“I was sort of like, ‘Take a good hard look at yourself. What’s wrong with you, Catherine?’</p> <p>While it took her time to make the complaint, Marriott rejected suggestions she should have taken the complaint to the police.</p> <p>“If I went to the police, it’s me versus him, which is a toxic space to be in. It will create no outcome for anyone else. It puts what happened that night on the public record and on top of that, I’m exhausted after eight months.</p> <p>“I would have had to go through the court system which is two, three, four years long. How much would that cost me?”</p> <p>Once the complaint was lodged to the WA National party, Marriott said it was leaked within days.</p> <p>“[The National party] leaked it,” Marriott said. “My name was leaked and that is one of the most frightening things that you will ever have to live through is when you finally.</p> <p>“Sorry I said I was not going to cry … anyway, you live through – you finally find the courage within yourself to stand up for what you believe in and then all control is taken away.”</p> <p>In a statement released ahead of the 7.30 Report, Barnaby Joyce denied any allegation of sexual harassment.</p> <p>“I asked that this be referred to the police if the complainant wished to pursue this issue so I had the capacity to defend myself, as I firmly believe the complaint to be spurious and defamatory,” he said.</p> <p>“This allegation should have been dealt with immediately [after] the complainant first believed there was an issue they wished to pursue, and the passage of nearly a year and a half since the time of the event to when the allegation was raised has not allowed a clearer determination on this issue.”</p> <p>Following an eight month internal investigation by the NSW National party (due to Joyce’s membership in the state), Marriott was furious when she was informed that there was “insufficient evidence” to come to a conclusion. The NSW National party would not confirm the findings and kept any details confidential.</p> <p>But Marriott described the change to the party’s processes for handling complaints as big steps in the right direction”, though she told Guardian Australia there was still “room for improvement with accountability on timeframes”.</p> <p>Marriott recommended to the Nationals that harassment complaints should be resolved within a month and that an independent, skilled mediator should be involved.</p> <p>While the party’s <a href="https://www.nswnationals.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/173807-Discrimination-and-Harassment-Policy_CON1.pdf" data-link-name="in body link" class="u-underline">harassment policy was updated in August 2018</a>, it states any complaints must be made within one year of the events taking place unless “the complainant can show that there is good reason why the complaint is late”. This could have ruled out Marriott’s complaint.</p> <p>A spokesman for the NSW National party said: “The NSW Nationals revised Harassment and Discrimination Policy is a comprehensive and efficient framework for the handling of any complaint, and is consistent with policies and regulatory schemes across Australia.”</p> <p>A spokesman for the Labor party confirmed Marriott had also reached out to the ALP.</p> <p>“Catherine Marriott has spoken with Labor about her keenness to work with the parliament to develop a policy to protect politicians, staff and public servants from bullying and harassment. We welcome her input and the Coalition should too.”</p> <p>She called for proper processes for dealing with complaints in political parties, the corporate world and not-for-profit sector. She said harassment was taking a toll on both the workforce, corporate knowledge and the economy.</p> <p>“If you think about it, 20% of people that have been harassed and handed in a complaint are leaving the work force,” she said. “That is a phenomenal corporate knowledge loss.”</p> <p><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/sep/12/barnaby-joyce-accuser-catherine-marriott-to-speak-on-sexual-harassment" data-link-name="in body link" class="u-underline">Marriott has garnered support</a> from influential rural women across social media after the inconclusive findings in the case. She will speak at #USTOO with journalist and campaigner Tracey Spicer, an event billed as <a href="https://www.trybooking.com/book/event?eid=422819&" data-link-name="in body link" class="u-underline">“Lessons from the leaders in Australia’s crusade against sexual harassment”</a> and organised by the Rural, Regional, Remote Women’s Network of Western Australian.</p> </div> <br> <br><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/sep/18/barnaby-joyce-sexual-harassment-allegation-catherine-marriott-speaks-out">Source link </a>

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