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Director Peter Weir flies to the defence of accused spy and filmmaker James Ricketson in Cambodian

<br><div> <!--endnoindex--> <p> By Matt Blomberg</p> <p class="published"> Posted <span class="timestamp"> August 17, 2018 01:05:34 </span> </p> <div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/james-heading-to-court/10129832"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10129830-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="James Ricketson called out from the prison van as it pulled through a throng of media." title="James heading to court" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/james-heading-to-court/10129832" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> James Ricketson called out from the prison van as it pulled through a throng of media. <span class="source">(Matt Blomberg)</span> </a></div> <p>The trial of Australian filmmaker James Ricketson began in Cambodia on Thursday, with a panel of judges grilling a character witness over the accused spy's finances and links to the Australian Government.</p><p>Fourteen months after Mr Ricketson was arrested and charged for flying a photographic drone over a political rally in Phnom Penh, the court opened the trial, in which the accused faces up to ten years in prison on espionage charges that have been panned as disproportionate to the alleged crime.</p><p>Acclaimed Australian film director Peter Weir took the stand as the defendant's first witness, and after a tedious back and forth regarding the specifics of his family and his work, Mr Weir opened a door for the prosecution, which is yet to provide any evidence to support allegations that Mr Ricketson posed a threat to Cambodia's national security. </p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-17/australian-filmmaker-james-ricketson/9557214"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/5376546-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Australian filmmaker James Ricketson" title="Australian filmmaker James Ricketson" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-17/australian-filmmaker-james-ricketson/9557214" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> James Ricketson has been in a Cambodian prison since June last year. <span class="source">(Lateline)</span> </a></div><p>Under intense and repetitive questioning over Mr Ricketson's political leanings, his body of work and his sources of funding, Mr Weir revealed through a translator that the accused had in the past received grants for film projects from "the Government".</p><p>Mr Weir quickly clarified that he was referring specifically to the Australian Film Commission, but the judges and prosecutor seized on the opening, digging into the witness for details of Mr Ricketson's collaborations with Canberra. </p><div class="inline-content right"> <a href="https://twitter.com/antbaliga/status/1030057032861212672"><span><strong>External Link:</strong> James being taken to court</span> </a></div><p>At one point, Mr Weir, who had been candid and anecdotal in more than two hours of questioning, threw his hands in the air and turned to the gallery with raised eyebrows after a judge instructed him to give short, simple answers to questions such as: "How much money has James received from the Australian Government?"</p><p>"I'm not his accountant," said Mr Weir, who went on to become close with Mr Ricketson after mentoring him at film school in the 1970s.</p><blockquote><blockquote class="quote--pullquote"><p>"I'm not his keeper; I'm his friend. How do you describe a friendship? Its not a legal thing."</p></blockquote></blockquote><p>Nevertheless, the judges went on probing, and kept the court in session more than an hour beyond schedule. </p><p>Mr Ricketson has been a frequent visitor to Cambodia over more than 20 years, making films, doing charity work and criticising the government of Prime Minister Hun Sen, whose Cambodian People's Party confirmed a monopoly of parliament this week, taking all 125 seats in last month's general election.</p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-06-04/james-ricketson/9831128"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/9796942-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="James Ricketson sits in a house in Cambodia with a woman and children in the background. " title="James Ricketson" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-06-04/james-ricketson/9831128" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> James Ricketson wants the Australian Government to do more to help him. <span class="source">(Supplied: Jesse Ricketson)</span> </a></div><p>The Australian arrived at the court in familiar fashion on Thursday, calling from the prison van as it pulled through a throng of media personnel.</p><p>"There is no victim. There is no complainant. There is no arrest warrant. And there is no evidence," he said.</p><p>"I am confident that a judge will see this, take it into account and find that I am not guilty."</p><h2>Legal team argued it was impossible to build a defence</h2><p>Proceedings began with another bail application, where Mr Ricketson's legal team argued it was near-impossible to build a defence given the administrative formalities involved with prison visits.</p><p>The judges rejected the request, citing the severity of the charges.</p><p>Campaigns across Australia have called for Canberra to intervene, with Mr Ricketson suffering from a number of health issues inside the notoriously overcrowded and under-resourced prison. </p><p>While Australian policy does not allow diplomats to officially interfere with Cambodia's judicial process, a spokesperson for the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade reiterated that the issue is being discussed "regularly" at the highest levels, with Foreign Minister Julie Bishop meeting with her Cambodian counterpart, Prak Sokhonn, in Singapore on August 4.</p><p>After the hearing, Jesse Ricketson, who relocated to Phnom Penh to support his father, said that after months of false starts and private meetings it was a relief to finally have the trial underway.</p><p>"We look forward to continuing proceedings on Monday so we can conclude it and get this horrible ordeal behind us," he said.</p> <p class="topics"> <strong>Topics:</strong> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/law-crime-and-justice">law-crime-and-justice</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/prisons-and-punishment">prisons-and-punishment</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/world-politics">world-politics</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/government-and-politics">government-and-politics</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/arts-and-entertainment">arts-and-entertainment</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/cambodia">cambodia</a> </p> <!--noindex--> </div><script async src="http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <br> <br><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/james-ricketson-filmmaker-cambodia-trial/10129780">Source link </a>

Aretha Franklin, Queen of Soul with a voice that influenced a generation of singers, dies aged 76

<br><div> <!--endnoindex--> <p class="published"> Updated <span class="timestamp"> August 17, 2018 00:35:11 </span> </p> <div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/aretha-franklin-sings-at-barack-obamas-inauguration/9728454"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/9728432-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Aretha Franklin sings at Barack Obama's inauguration" title="Aretha Franklin sings at Barack Obama's inauguration" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/aretha-franklin-sings-at-barack-obamas-inauguration/9728454" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Aretha Franklin sings during the inauguration ceremony for president-elect Barack Obama in 2009. <span class="source">(Reuters: Jason Reed)</span> </a></div> <p>Aretha Franklin, the teenage gospel singer who rose to become the Queen of Soul, selling 75 million records and inspiring generations, has died.</p><p>Publicist Gwendolyn Quinn told The Associated Press through a family statement that Franklin died on Thursday at 9:50am (local time) at her home in Detroit.</p><p>A family statement said "Franklin's official cause of death was due to advance pancreatic cancer of the neuroendocrine type, which was confirmed by Franklin's oncologist, Dr Philip Phillips of Karmanos Cancer Institute" in Detroit.</p><p>Franklin was known for her powerful voice and for many hits, including Respect, (You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman, Chain of Fools and Think.</p><p>She won 18 Grammy Awards and became the first female performer inducted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.</p><div class="inline-content full"> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHsnZT7Z2yQ"><span><strong>External Link:</strong> Aretha Franklin performs (You Make Me Feel) Like A Natural Woman in 2015</span> </a></div><p>The singer was born in Memphis, Tennessee, but moved as a child to Detroit, where her father, CL Franklin, became a pastor at the New Bethel Baptist Church.</p><p>It was there Franklin began singing before, at 18, expressing a desire to shift from the world of gospel to pop, a move her father supported.</p><p>She was signed to Columbia Records in 1960, with her father as her manager, but it wasn't until a move to Atlantic in 1967, and the release of I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You), that she started to see commercial success.<br/></p><p>Her version that year of Respect, written by Otis Redding, became an anthem for the civil rights movement, which was reaching its zenith in the United States.</p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/aretha-franklin-in-1967/10115084"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10114942-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Aretha Franklin in a 1967 advertisement for her single Baby I Love You." title="Aretha Franklin in 1967" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/aretha-franklin-in-1967/10115084" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Aretha Franklin in a 1967 advertisement for her single Baby I Love You. <span class="source">(Wikimedia Commons: Billboard)</span> </a></div><p>It helped that Franklin had deep connections to that world.</p><p>Her father walked side-by-side with Dr Martin Luther King Jnr at a major rally the elder Franklin helped organise in Detroit in 1963.</p><p>In 1968, Franklin sang Precious Lord, an old gospel song, at a memorial for Dr King.</p><div class="inline-content full"> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0POmdK18WU"><span><strong>External Link:</strong> Aretha Franklin performs Respect in the 1960s</span> </a></div><p>Franklin continued to release music in the following decades, scoring hits in the 1980s with a version of The Rolling Stones' Jumpin' Jack Flash and I Knew You Were Waiting For Me, a duet with George Michael.</p><p>Her influence stretched far among female African-American singers, from Tina Turner and Whitney Houston to Ms Lauryn Hill, whom Franklin worked with in 1998, and Beyonce, who sung a version of Precious Lord at the Grammys in 2015.</p><p>"Nobody embodies more fully the connection between the African-American spiritual, the blues, R&B, rock and roll — the way that hardship and sorrow were transformed into something full of beauty and vitality and hope," Barack Obama told The New Yorker in 2016.</p><p>Franklin suffered from depression and alcoholism over the years, and her health began to decline in 2010, when she had a tumour removed.</p><p>She cancelled a series of concerts on doctors' orders last year and this year.</p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/aretha-franklin-performing-in-november-2017/9728394"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/9728338-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Aretha Franklin performing in November 2017" title="Aretha Franklin performing in November 2017" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/aretha-franklin-performing-in-november-2017/9728394" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Aretha Franklin performs at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City in 2017. <span class="source">(Reuters: Shannon Stapleton)</span> </a></div> <p class="topics"> <strong>Topics:</strong> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/music">music</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/arts-and-entertainment">arts-and-entertainment</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/soul">soul</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/gospel">gospel</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/united-states">united-states</a> </p> <p class="published"> First posted <span class="timestamp"> August 17, 2018 00:18:20 </span> </p> <!--noindex--> </div> <br> <br><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/aretha-franklin-queen-of-soul-dies-aged-76/10114234">Source link </a>

Educator

<br><div id=""><p><strong>Educator </strong></p> <p>Goodstart is Australia’s largest early learning provider.  As a not–for–profit social enterprise, we exist purely to improve the lives of Australia’s children and their families. Our people are our foundation, together we are working to ensure children have the learning, development and wellbeing outcomes they need for school and life.</p> <p> </p> <p>We’re looking for an inspiring and enthusiastic educator to join a highly motivated team, providing fun and educational programs to children in our care.</p> <p> </p> <p>As a passionate childcare professional you will be committed to providing the highest quality of care and will be rewarded with the opportunity to build your career within a supportive and rewarding environment.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Our centre</strong></p> <ul><li>Welcoming and fun environment</li> <li>67 place centre</li> <li>Over 90% occupancy</li> <li>Exceeding National  Quality Standards</li> <li>Based in Beaumaris</li> </ul><p> </p> <p><strong>Your role</strong></p> <ul><li>Certificate III level early childhood qualification (ACECQA approved)</li> <li>Hold a current First Aid qualification</li> <li>Permanent Part Time</li> <li>37.5 hours per week on a rotating roster (full flexibility preferred)</li> <li>Floating position</li> </ul><p> </p> <p><strong>Responsibilities</strong></p> <ul><li>Actively contribute to the education program in the room and the centre team</li> <li>Engage and supervise the children at all times</li> <li>Maintain a safe environment for children, families and team members</li> <li>Build and maintain strong, positive relationships with children and families</li> <li>Comply with National Quality Standards and Goodstart policies and procedures</li> <li>Support a culture of reflective practice and ongoing continuous improvement</li> </ul><p> </p> <p><strong>The benefits</strong></p> <ul><li>Competitive above award wages</li> <li>Supportive and friendly team</li> <li>Ability to cash in annual leave</li> <li>Option to purchase additional annual leave</li> <li>Comprehensive induction and training programme</li> <li>Discounted childcare fees</li> <li>Professional development opportunities</li> <li>Career pathways</li> <li>Uniform allowance</li> </ul><p> </p> <p>If you have a passion for working with children, then this is the role for you!</p> <p> </p> <p>Goodstart is committed to child safety, with a zero tolerance of child abuse, and expect all our employees to reflect this commitment. Should you strive to uphold and reflect these values then we would love to hear from you!</p> <p> </p> <p>To apply, please click “Apply Now” to complete the Goodstart Inspiring Careers process. #gseducator</p> <p> </p> <p>Posting Notes: <span>BEAUMARIS, MELBOURNE</span> || <span>VIC</span> || Australia (AU) || VIC North - Region 31 || SF:LI || Certificate III - Children's Services or equiv || Part-Time</p> </div> <br> <br><a href="http://jobviewtrack.com/en-au/job-4c18416849110c0f531b52625b555e565322475c5b431f/ec585dfb56c21de5036c3f3f2f71d452.html">APPLY NOW </a>

Aretha Franklin: The performance that floored a fellow music legend — and a president

<br><div> <!--endnoindex--> <p class="published"> Updated <span class="timestamp"> August 17, 2018 00:38:10 </span> </p> <div class="inline-content full"> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHsnZT7Z2yQ"><span><strong>External Link:</strong> Aretha Franklin performs (You Make Me Feel) Like A Natural Woman in 2015</span> </a></div> <p>Carole King can't sit still.</p><p>Look at her: first she's blowing kisses, then she's covering her mouth in shock. At one point it looks like she's about to pass out from astonishment.</p><p>This is the kind of impact an Aretha Franklin performance can have — and on a fellow music legend, no less.</p><p>This moment, Franklin's performance of (You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman at Washington DC's Kennedy Centre in 2015, charmed social media when the video emerged, and it tells you something about Franklin's impact and her legacy.</p><p>Franklin takes the stage alone. </p><p>She pushes her mink coat aside and sits at the piano. A few chords, the band kicks in, then boom: that voice. <em>Looking out on the morning rain</em>.</p><p>The sound seems to knock the wind out of King, who wrote the song with her husband, Gerry Goffin, in the 1960s.</p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/aretha-franklin-performing-in-november-2017/9728394"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/9728338-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Aretha Franklin performing in November 2017" title="Aretha Franklin performing in November 2017" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/aretha-franklin-performing-in-november-2017/9728394" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Aretha Franklin performs at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City in 2017. <span class="source">(Reuters: Shannon Stapleton)</span> </a></div><p>Franklin's voice starts deep and smooth and full of grace. By two lines in she's got the US president wiping a tear from his eye. </p><p>The energy builds in the bridge, before that chorus — that chorus! — sees Franklin hitting the upper registers. It puts King on her feet, shouting along with each word.</p><p>A Natural Woman was nearly 50 years old at this point. Franklin was in her early 70s, slowing down her schedule. </p><p>But this performance reminded a lot of people of her talent and her significance.</p><h2>Of course, part of that significance is the voice</h2><p>She is considered one of the greatest singers in pop history. Tina Turner, Whitney Houston, Beyoncé: the debt runs deep in American music. </p><p>Franklin emerged from the world of gospel in the 1950s, when black churches were epicentres not just of faith but fraternity. Christendom was a key part of the struggle for equality — Dr Martin Luther King was a reverend, after all.</p><p>Aretha was a pop star with a strong link to that world. </p><p>Her father and first manager, C.L. Franklin, was a pastor at Detroit's New Bethel church and a friend of King's. He helped organise the Detroit march for freedom in 1963. </p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/aretha-franklin-sings-at-barack-obamas-inauguration/9728454"> <img src="http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/9728432-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Aretha Franklin sings at Barack Obama's inauguration" title="Aretha Franklin sings at Barack Obama's inauguration" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/aretha-franklin-sings-at-barack-obamas-inauguration/9728454" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Aretha Franklin sings during the inauguration ceremony for president-elect Barack Obama in 2009. <span class="source">(Reuters: Jason Reed)</span> </a></div><p>In April of 1968, Aretha Franklin sung at a memorial service for Dr King. She did Precious Lord, an old gospel tune. (Beyoncé, in a nod to her hero, would do a rendition 50 years later at the Grammys.)</p><p>Franklin, like her mentor Mahalia Jackson, took gospel to the world of pop. She blended piousness with rebellion, through new songs and old hymns, and gave the world a product of hope at a time of deep despair for black Americans.</p><p>That hope was couched in an understanding of struggles, not just political but personal. </p><p>She endured depression, alcoholism, bad relationships, her father's estrangement and, in 1979, his murder. She was famously paranoid about her earnings — she would keep her performance fee, in cash, tucked into her purse on stage — and had a debilitating fear of flying. </p><blockquote class="quote--pullquote"><p>"Anguish surrounds Aretha as surely as the glory of her musical aura," Atlantic Records founder Jerry Wexler once said.</p></blockquote><p>But the belief in a better day always won out. </p><p>"Nobody embodies more fully the connection between the African-American spiritual, the blues, R & B, rock and roll — the way that hardship and sorrow were transformed into something full of beauty and vitality and hope," Barack Obama told The New Yorker in 2016.</p><p>Towards the end of the video, as Franklin drops her mink, mid-song, and the audience rises to its feet and King punches the air, it feels like an accomplishment. A triumph. That's what music can do.</p><p>Today, we should all rewatch that performance. Sing along, lose your breath, punch the air. </p><p>Today, we are all Carol King.</p> <p class="topics"> <strong>Topics:</strong> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/music">music</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/soul">soul</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/gospel">gospel</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/united-states">united-states</a> </p> <p class="published"> First posted <span class="timestamp"> August 17, 2018 00:35:11 </span> </p> <!--noindex--> </div> <br> <br><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-17/aretha-franklin-performance-that-floored-a-fellow-music-legend/9567728">Source link </a>

‘March of Mothers’ Held in Moscow to Protest Detention of Teenagers Charged as Dissidents

<br>Hundreds of protesters marched on August 15 to the Russian Supreme Court in Moscow to oppose the detention of two young women, held on extremism charges since March and accused of being part of an anti-government group, the Moscow Times said. Dubbed the “March of Mothers,” the protest focused on two women, aged 18 and 19, arrested along with eight other members of a WhatsApp group called New Greatness, which prosecutors say was planning to topple the government. The defendants’ lawyers said the group only discussed politics and their day-to-day lives. Credit: Sota Vision via Storyful <br> <br><a href="https://www.news.com.au/video/id-5348771529001-5822915602001/march-of-mothers-held-in-moscow-to-protest-detention-of-teenagers-charged-as-dissidents">Source link </a>

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