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Native title sea rights claim to protect unique Groote Eylandt marine environment

<br><div> <!--endnoindex--> <p class="published"> Posted <span class="timestamp"> December 18, 2018 13:55:27 </span> </p> <div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/rangers-patrol-to-waters-around-groote-eylandt-1/10620464"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10620198-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Rangers patrol to waters around Groote Eylandt" title="Rangers patrol the waters around Groote Eylandt" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/rangers-patrol-to-waters-around-groote-eylandt-1/10620464" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Rangers patrol the waters around Groote Eylandt <span class="source">(ABC News: Jane Bardon)</span> </a></div> <p>The Anindilyakwa Indigenous people of Groote Eylandt want to better protect their waters.</p><p>And early next year, they plan to lodge a native title claim over 17,000 square kilometres of ocean from Groote Eylandt to the mainland to help them do it.</p><p>"Hopefully by having this native title claim over the sea country, that will enable us to have rights as Indigenous people living on the coastline," Anindilyakwa Land Council chairman and traditional owner Tony Wurramarrba told 7.30.</p><p>After studying satellite imagery which showed apparent scarring on the seabed, the council became increasingly worried about damage by commercial fishing trawlers.</p><p>"We think there should be better controls and accountability around the fishing that goes on in these waters.," Mark Hewitt, the council's chief executive, told 7.30.</p><blockquote class="quote--pullquote"><p>"Currently, we see evidence of considerable damage occurring, both for the flora and the fauna, from the trawling business."</p></blockquote><p>Traditional owners are also worried about what will happen when the Northern Territory Government's moratorium on seabed mining expires in 2021.</p><p>For the past eight years, they have been fending off plans by a series of companies to mine 11 rich manganese tenements in the ocean off Groote Eylandt.</p><p>"Whether its native title, whether it's the moratorium on seabed mining, the more protections we can apply, the safer this very unique culture will be," Mr Hewitt said.</p><h2>Protecting some of Australia's most biodiverse waters</h2><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/rangers-retrieve-an-abandoned-net-off-groote-eylandt-1/10620028"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10616412-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Rangers retrieve an abandoned net off Groote Eylandt" title="Rangers retrieve an abandoned net off Groote Eylandt" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/rangers-retrieve-an-abandoned-net-off-groote-eylandt-1/10620028" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Rangers retrieve an abandoned net off Groote Eylandt <span class="source">(ABC News: Jane Bardon)</span> </a></div><p>As they patrol the spectacular coastline of the Groote Eylandt Archipelago, the Anindilyakwa Land and Sea Rangers despair at the amount of floating rubbish they find in its aquamarine waters.</p><p>"You can see the bits of abandoned fishing nets from Indonesia up on the rocks there," senior ranger Keith Lambert pointed out.</p><blockquote class="quote--pullquote"><p>"There is more pollution now, particularly plastics, than there ever was.</p></blockquote><p>"The bottle tops are the worst things that turtles can pick up, because the turtles can't go down once they've taken a bit of plastic, and then they end up washed up on the beach, or floating dead somewhere."</p><p>Fifty kilometres off the Northern Territory coast in the Gulf of Carpentaria, the Groote Archipelago has some of Australia's most biodiverse waters.</p><p>The sea rangers are working with Northern Territory Government senior marine scientist Carol Palmer to research why rare dolphins, called false killer whales, congregate here.</p><p>The islands are also a hotspot for spinner, snubfin, humpback and bottlenose dolphins, dugongs and manta rays.</p><p>"There's something very, very unique about it, that these big, top-order predators, particularly the false killer whales, are circling the Groote Archipelago," Dr Palmer said.</p><p>They are satellite tagging the false killer whales to find out whether they are a distinct resident population and should be classified as vulnerable or threatened.</p><p>"They need to eat a lot of fish, and so there's certain areas like Groote Eylandt that are obviously really productive, and to be able to identify those, means that we can potentially manage those areas, and these species, into the long term," Dr Palmer said.</p><h2>'Native title claim should be strong'</h2><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/brendan-yantarrnga-shows-some-rock-art-on-groote-eylandt-1/10620076"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10616422-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Brendan Yantarrnga shows some rock art on Groote Eylandt" title="Brendan Yantarrnga shows some rock art on Groote Eylandt" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/brendan-yantarrnga-shows-some-rock-art-on-groote-eylandt-1/10620076" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Brendan Yantarrnga shows some rock art on Groote Eylandt <span class="source">(ABC News: Jane Bardon)</span> </a></div><p>To gain native title the traditional owners will have to prove a history of occupying and using the sea.</p><p>That's depicted in the island's ancient rock art, which includes many paintings of dolphins, dugongs and turtles.</p><p>"These animals are important for us as totems," Anindilyakwa sea ranger Brendan Yantarrnga said.</p><p>"They are also important for hunting; the turtles and stingray."</p><p>Anthropologist for the Anindilyakwa Land Council Leslie Pyne has been collecting the information needed for the claim from traditional owners.</p><blockquote class="quote--pullquote"><p>"They've been trading with the Macassans over hundreds of years, so there's a strong argument to suggest the people of this region have traditionally used the sea, and it belongs to them, and this native title claim should be strong," she told 7.30.</p></blockquote><p>As soon as the claim is lodged, the fishing, mining, oil and gas industries will have to negotiate with traditional owners to enter the area.</p><p>"With exploitive industries, such as oil and gas and the fishing industry, we're keen to have a seat at the table to be able to negotiate best practice in those types of activities," Mr Hewitt said.</p><h2>'Tapestry of dreaming tracks'</h2><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/groote-eylandt-native-title-claim-map-1/10620410"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10620378-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Groote Eylandt native title claim map" title="Groote Eylandt native title claim map" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/groote-eylandt-native-title-claim-map-1/10620410" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> A map of the native title claim around Groote Eylandt. <span class="source">(Supplied: Northern Land Council)</span> </a></div><p>The claim is being lodged by a total of 23 clans from the Groote Archipelago, Numbulwar and Ngukurr, with the Northern Land Council (NLC) — which represents the mainland clans — leading the legal action.</p><p>The clans have grouped together as the Makarda Claim Group, meaning "sea" in the Anindilyakwa language.</p><p>"The Makarda Claim Group seeks a determination that will include the right of native title holders to take resources from their sea country for any purpose," NLC acting CEO Rick Fletcher said.</p><blockquote class="quote--pullquote"><p>"Clans on the islands and mainland have strong ceremonial, cultural, economic and familial connections to each other.</p></blockquote><p>"Together, they look after a tapestry of dreaming tracks which criss-cross the ocean."</p><h2>'Certainty needed for industry'</h2><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/katherine-winchester,-ceo-of-the-nt-seafood-council-1/10620178"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10616430-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Katherine Winchester, CEO of the NT Seafood Council" title="Katherine Winchester, CEO of the NT Seafood Council" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/katherine-winchester,-ceo-of-the-nt-seafood-council-1/10620178" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Katherine Winchester of the NT Seafood Council is concerned that jobs will be lost in the fishing industry. <span class="source">(ABC News: Jane Bardon)</span> </a></div><p>The Northern Territory Seafood Council sees the claim as a potential threat to the remote jobs the Territory's small but valuable fishing industry provides.</p><p>"Around Groote Eylandt there's the Northern Prawn Fishery, also mackerel fishing, and closer to the mainland we have mud crab and barramundi fishing," council chief executive Katherine Winchester told 7.30.</p><p>The Seafood Council expects it will have to be a party to the case once it starts in the Federal Court, to defend the commercial fishing industry's interests.</p><blockquote class="quote--pullquote"><p>"It's about putting forward what the area means to the industry, and making sure that's taken into account, so existing commercial activities continue with certainty," Ms Winchester said.</p></blockquote><p>"We don't deny the need to have rights recognised, but with Blue Mud Bay, and native title claims, it's a lot of time and energy spent in courtrooms, and we don't want that," she said.</p><p>"We want to work on community, with traditional owners, to figure out solutions."</p><h2>Net of fishing closures tightening</h2><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/a-false-killer-dolphin-plays-in-the-waters-off-groote-eylandt-1/10629746"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10620206-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="A False Killer Whale plays in the waters off Groote Eylandt" title="A False Killer Whale plays in the waters off Groote Eylandt" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/a-false-killer-dolphin-plays-in-the-waters-off-groote-eylandt-1/10629746" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> A False Killer Whale plays in the waters off Groote Eylandt <span class="source">(ABC News: Jane Bardon)</span> </a></div><p>The industry is already alarmed by the prospect of losing access to some of its richest fishing grounds.</p><p>Traditional owners have threatened to lock them out of 80 per cent of the Northern Territory coastline, after a decade of stalled negotiations following the Blue Mud Bay Land Rights Law High Court decision.</p><p>The successful 2010 native title claim over Queensland's Torres Strait set the precedent that traditional owners could gain rights to large areas of the ocean.</p><p>If the Groote Eylandt sea claim succeeds that would encourage other Northern Territory Aboriginal groups worried about potential impacts from commercial fishing and gas exploration to follow suit.</p><p>"We've been speaking to communities all around the coastline and we absolutely understand that communities want to be part of fisheries management, they want to make local decisions, they want to understand what's happening in their back yard," Ms Winchester said.</p><p>The area claimed around Groote Eylandt contains both Northern Territory and Commonwealth waters.</p><p>Neither government directly answered questions about whether they would support or oppose the claim.</p><p>"The [NT] Government supports the rights of traditional owners to lodge native title claims and will work constructively with established native title holders to discuss and negotiate a solution which achieves positive outcomes for native title holders and impacted parties," Chief Minister Michael Gunner told 7.30.</p><p>A spokesman for Federal Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion said the Minister, "supports the rights of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to pursue the recognition of their ownership of Indigenous land under relevant legislation".</p><h2>Economic development hopes</h2><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/a-giant-clam-in-the-water-near-groote-eylandt-1/10620144"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10616424-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="A giant clam in the water near Groote Eylandt" title="A giant clam in the water near Groote Eylandt" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/a-giant-clam-in-the-water-near-groote-eylandt-1/10620144" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> The Anindilyakwa people hope to farm giant clams if their claim is successful. <span class="source">(ABC News: Jane Bardon)</span> </a></div><p>The Anindilyakwa people hope the claim will bolster their plan to revisit abandoned attempts to farm giant clams and sea cucumbers.</p><p>That would help reduce their dependency on royalties from the island's manganese mine, which is due to close in 11 years.</p><blockquote class="quote--pullquote"><p>"The sea country, it is our supermarket, and for us it is a base for our economic future here on the island," Mr Wurramarrba said.</p></blockquote><p>"In a big way it will open economic doors for us as people living here on the coastline."</p><p>Ms Winchester said that was something the seafood industry was keen to cooperate on with traditional owners from Groote Eylandt and across the Northern Territory.</p><p>"We've got industry who are willing to partner with communities," she said.</p><p>"It's a lot of hard work and it's a lot of investment to get it right, but we've already got some successful examples around the coastline."</p><p>"Regardless of the native title claim, we want to improve relationships between all parties, because at the end of the day if you don't have good relationships and good understandings, then you don't have a viable industry."</p> <p class="topics"> <strong>Topics:</strong> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/indigenous-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander">indigenous-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/land-rights">land-rights</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/water-pollution">water-pollution</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/environmental-impact">environmental-impact</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/environmental-management">environmental-management</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/numbulwar-0852">numbulwar-0852</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/nt">nt</a> </p> <!--noindex--> </div> <br> <br><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/groote-eylandt-native-title-sea-rights-marine-environment/10611298">Source link </a>

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Hobart Airport feeling the squeeze as tourism takes off

<br><div> <!--endnoindex--> <p class="published"> Posted <span class="timestamp"> December 19, 2018 05:20:28 </span> </p> <div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-19/visitors-walk-under-hobart-airport-sign-1/10632184"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10632162-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Visitors walk under Hobart Airport sign" title="Visitors walk under Hobart Airport sign" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-19/visitors-walk-under-hobart-airport-sign-1/10632184" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> More than half of Tasmania's visitors come through Hobart Airport. <span class="source">(ABC News: David Hudspeth)</span> </a></div> <div class="attached-content"> <div class="inline-content story left"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-02-15/hobart-commuters-vent-anger-over-huge-traffic-jam/9449206"><strong>Related Story:</strong> 'Welcome to Slowbart'. Commuters see red after major gridlock in Hobart</a></div> <div class="inline-content story left"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-07-04/virgin-hobart-to-perth-flights-announced/9938524"><strong>Related Story:</strong> Direct flights to Perth from Hobart to begin in two months</a></div> </div> <p>As Tasmanian visitor numbers continue to steadily climb, more passengers are using Hobart Airport as their gateway to the island state, and even the airport admits things are "squeezy". </p><div class="inline-content wysiwyg right"> <div class="inner"> <h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Hobart Airport struggling to keep up with surge in arrivals</li><li>Master plan still 10 months away</li><li>In contrast, Launceston Airport continues to win accolades</li></ul></div> </div><div class="inline-content right"> <a href="https://gfycat.com/GiddyQuarrelsomeHairstreak"><span><strong>External Link:</strong> Tourism branding 2</span> </a></div><p>ABC News in Tasmania is investigating the advantages and disadvantages of the state's tourism boom and whether the state is keeping pace with the growth.</p><p>The Hobart Airport is planning a major overhaul to keep up with growing passenger numbers, but the expansion will not happen quickly, and there are questions about why the state's northern airport has been able to more successfully get ahead of the crush. </p><p>Australia's southern-most airport has experienced 6 per cent year-on-year growth over the past four years, with 2.6 million people making their way through the terminal in the past year. </p><p>It is the first or last stop for 60 per cent of visitors to Tasmania.</p><p>In a bid to keep up with the increase, Hobart Airport has given the arrivals hall a makeover, almost completed a new $13 million freight terminal and recently put the finishing touches on a new $4.5 million departures lounge. </p><div class="inline-content full"> <a href="https://gfycat.com/WhimsicalFaroffAmmonite"><span><strong>External Link:</strong> Visitor growth at Hobart Aiport</span> </a></div><p>The lounge has opened up more space and offers more food and beverage options for passengers, in time for the peak summer season. </p><h2>Masterplan will increase footprint</h2><div class="inline-content right"> <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BqTvDWRAqUE/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet"><span><strong>External Link:</strong> Instagram photo of baording at Hobart Airport</span> </a></div><p>But the renovations have been somewhat of a quick fix, and the airport's chief executive Sarah Renner said more needed to be done. </p><blockquote class="quote--pullquote"><p>"Certainly it can get a little bit squeezy at times and we're concentrating at the moment on our master planning," Ms Renner said. </p></blockquote><p>A masterplan that would expand the airport's footprint by more than 10 per cent needs to go through a major development planning process, with the Federal Infrastructure Minister's approval. </p><p>Ms Renner said the concept design process for an overhauled airport was underway and would take about 10 months. </p><p>"So effectively we're planning for the future and that future is to see out the terminal out to as far as 2030," Ms Renner said. </p><p>"We do need to expand it, give passengers a variety of options around food and beverage, retail and so forth.</p><p>"We are looking at undercover walkways as well, as a possibility out to the aircraft."</p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-19/sarah-renner-and-matt-cocker-1/10630844"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10630450-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Sarah Renner and Matt Cocker at Hobart Airport" title="Sarah Renner and Matt Cocker" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-19/sarah-renner-and-matt-cocker-1/10630844" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Sarah Renner and Matt Cocker are responsible for driving improvements at Hobart Airport. <span class="source">(ABC News: Tony King)</span> </a></div><p>In the shorter-term, the airport will change the way planes move around the apron, so passengers spend less time waiting on the tarmac.</p><p>Earlier this year, passengers had to be kept waiting on planes while bottlenecks were sorted.</p><p>The executive general manager of operations, Matt Cocker, said it would address space issues when flights were delayed because of issues interstate. </p><p>"Seven bays allows us to have seven aircraft parking at the same time," Mr Cocker said. </p><p>"At the moment we have five bays and, at times, due to off-schedule arrivals, they might be standing off on an apron from time to time. </p><p>"So seven bays certainly does help us with that."</p><h2>'Launceston's been able to do it' </h2><p>The tourism industry lobby is concerned about a historic absence of long-term clarity at Hobart Airport. </p><p>Luke Martin from the Tourism Industry Council of Tasmania said the airport has had a series of attempts at masterplans over 20 years. </p><p>"The experience for people when they're down there, whether they're locals or visitors, isn't probably what we want it to be," Mr Martin said.</p><div class="inline-content photo right"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-19/luke-martin-tourism-industry-council/10630850"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/9864074-3x2-340x227.jpg" alt="Luke Martin Tourism Industry Council." title="Luke Martin Tourism Industry Council" width="340" height="227"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-19/luke-martin-tourism-industry-council/10630850" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Luke Martin says it is frustrating that Launceston has been able to achieve what Hobart hasn't. <span class="source">(ABC News: Scott Ross)</span> </a></div><p>"And that's been a long-term issue from the airport."</p><p>Mr Martin said the Launceston gateway, which has been named Major Airport of the Year three times by the Australian Airport Association, appeared to have been able to achieve what Hobart Airport had not.</p><p>"I find it frustrating that we've actually got two major airports in Tasmania," he said. </p><p>"Launceston's been able to do it, [it's] incredibly good and one of the best regional airports in Australia, and Hobart hasn't."</p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-19/wing-of-virgin-airlines-plane-1/10631178"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10631010-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Wing of Virgin Airlines plane" title="Wing of Virgin Airlines plane" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-19/wing-of-virgin-airlines-plane-1/10631178" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Undercover exits from planes are still some way off. <span class="source">(Supplied: Nathan Cosgrove)</span> </a></div><p>But the northern airport's general manager, Paul Hodgen, said the state's northern terminals received about 1.2 million fewer passengers than Hobart each year. </p><p>"I'm not one to disparage our friends down south. As a state capital, they're always going to enjoy significant growth," Mr Hodgen said. </p><p>He said the northern airport had had to work harder to secure extra capacity and flights, investing in an extension, security screening upgrades and a terminal reconfiguration over the past two years. </p><p>"Airlines have loved it [and] … certainly our airline customers have appreciated them," Mr Hodgen said. </p><p>"Their flights are departing much more punctually. Passengers are through security screening very quickly now and are having that time to rest and relax and enjoy the new customer experience."</p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-19/paul-hodgen-1/10630842"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10630456-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Paul Hodgen at Launceston Airport" title="Paul Hodgen" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-19/paul-hodgen-1/10630842" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Paul Hodgen says Launceston Airport is working on a master plan which extends beyond 20 years. <span class="source">(ABC News: Manika Dadson)</span> </a></div><p>Launceston Airport has launched its own masterplan process to settle on a vision that extends for 20 years, but Mr Hodgen acknowledged it was a challenging process for any airport. </p><p>"We don't want to build too much too early and it not get used," he said.</p><p>"We need to be a cost-efficient airport. We can't do that. Likewise you don't want to build it too late."</p><h2>No international flights in sight </h2><p>With the help of $38 million in federal funds, Hobart Airport's extended runway opened this year. </p><p>The aim was to enable international flights.</p><p>But without any customs, quarantine or immigration services, and no airline committed to connecting Hobart to overseas cities, international flights are still 18 months to two years away. </p><p>"So certainly in the next couple of years, we continue our conversations … approaching different international airlines while we look at expanding the facility to accommodate them," Ms Renner said. </p><p>She said the airport was consulting with Border Force about federal requirements for international flights. </p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-19/hobart-airport-farewell/10631168"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/9593482-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Send off at Hobart Airport" title="Hobart Airport farewell" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-19/hobart-airport-farewell/10631168" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> It will be at least two years before international flights arrive at Hobart Airport. <span class="source">(ABC News: Gregor Salmon)</span> </a></div> <p class="topics"> <strong>Topics:</strong> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/industry">industry</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/travel-and-tourism">travel-and-tourism</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/rural-tourism">rural-tourism</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/hobart-7000">hobart-7000</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/launceston-7250">launceston-7250</a> </p> <!--noindex--> </div><script async defer src="http://platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <br> <br><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-19/hobart-airport-under-pressure-from-growing-visitor-numbers/10630256">Source link </a>

Surf’s Up on San Francisco Coast

<br>A winter storm that moved ashore on the Californian coast over the weekend was still rolling in the surf on Tuesday, December 18, although the wave heights were dropping. This video shows Central Ocean Beach in San Francisco. Credit: Surfline.com via Storyful <br> <br><a href="https://www.news.com.au/video/id-5348771529001-5981070421001/surfs-up-on-san-francisco-coast">Source link </a>

Ice-affected driver Jo Lim jailed for killing Lisa Di Donato in Rowville crash

<br><div> <!--endnoindex--> <p class="published"> Updated <span class="timestamp"> December 18, 2018 15:15:17 </span> </p> <div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/lisa-di-donato-1/10630910"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10630892-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Lisa Di Donato with a friend." title="Lisa Di Donato" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/lisa-di-donato-1/10630910" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> Lisa Di Donato was a decent, hard-working woman loved and admired by all, the judge said. <span class="source">(Facebook)</span> </a></div> <p>A driver who smoked ice for breakfast before smashing a ute into another car, killing its 27-year-old occupant, will spend at least five years in prison before he is likely to be deported to Malaysia. </p><div class="inline-content wysiwyg right"> <div class="inner"> <h2>Key points:</h2><ul><li>Jo Lim was sentenced to a maximum of eight years for killing Lisa Di Donato</li><li>He was affected by ice and banned from driving when he crashed into her car</li><li>The victim's mother said she was disappointed with the sentence, but Lim's likely deportation was a "saving grace"</li></ul></div> </div><p>Jo Lim was on bail and disqualified from driving when he crashed a borrowed ute at an intersection in Melbourne's south-east on February 15, killing young pharmacist Lisa Di Donato.</p><p>Lim had smoked methamphetamine that morning and was travelling more than 80 kilometres an hour when he crashed into Ms Di Donato's driver side door, as she waited at a red light near a shopping centre in Rowville.</p><p>Lim left scene of the collision but returned a short time later and was arrested.</p><p>"The life of a decent, hard-working woman with a loving partner and family, who was admired and loved by all, has been lost," County Court Judge Paul Lacava said.</p><blockquote class="quote--pullquote"><p>"The deceased's partner has had his life virtually turned upside down by your actions in causing this collision. Each of the victims have suffered a profound sense of needless loss at your hands."</p></blockquote><p>Lim was sentenced to a maximum of eight years in prison for multiple offences, including culpable driving causing death, with a non-parole period of five years.</p><p>Judge Lacava noted that Lim, a Malaysian national, could be deported upon his release and this would make his time in prison "more burdensome".</p><p>Lim has been banned from driving for life.</p><h2>'The legal system is not on our side'</h2><p>Outside court, Ms Di Donato's mother Elena criticised the sentence as too short but took some comfort in the fact Lim may be deported.</p><p>"I'm so disappointed that my daughter's life is worth only five years," she said.</p><p>"Having listened to the judge last time I really thought that [the judge] would impose a harsher sentence considering this man has been in and out of the legal system for 10 years.</p><p>"The only saving grace is that he's going to be deported."</p><div class="inline-content photo full"> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/elena-di-donato,-mother-of-the-victim-lisa-di-donato-1/10631842"> <img src="https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/10631836-3x2-700x467.jpg" alt="Framed by cameras, a mother speaks with emotion" title="Elena Di Donato, mother of the victim Lisa Di Donato" width="700" height="467"/></a><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/elena-di-donato,-mother-of-the-victim-lisa-di-donato-1/10631842" class="inline-caption"><strong> Photo:</strong> "The legal system is not on our side," Elena Di Donato, the mother of the victim, said. <span class="source">(AAP: Ellen Smith)</span> </a></div><p>Ms Di Donato said the justice system was too heavily weighted to support the criminals.</p><p>"The legal system is not on our side, it's on their side," she said.</p><p>"I've lost my daughter and our family has lost someone and I have to live with that.</p><p>"The sad thing is that tomorrow we'll be forgotten, and some other poor family will go through exactly what we're going through."</p><h2>Driver had history of law-breaking</h2><p>The court heart Lim suffered a brain injury after being involved in a crash in 2011, but Judge Lacava said his cognitive deficits would not have affected his ability to drive a vehicle.</p><p>He had a long history of drug abuse and driving offences, racking up 22 infringement notices for speeding between 2003 and 2016.</p><p>On one day in 2013, Lim clocked up seven traffic infringement notices, four of which were for exceeding the speed limit by more than 30 kilometres an hour.</p><p>"Clearly your driving record is appalling, and you should not have been driving on the day that you offended," Judge Lacava said.</p><p>"Your prospects for not reoffending are bleak."</p><p>Judge Lacava said Lim would have been sentenced to 10 years' prison, with a non-parole period of seven years, had he not entered a guilty plea.</p><p>He is already serving a five-month sentence for another driving offence.</p> <p class="topics"> <strong>Topics:</strong> <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/courts-and-trials">courts-and-trials</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/law-crime-and-justice">law-crime-and-justice</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/road">road</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/accidents">accidents</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/disasters-and-accidents">disasters-and-accidents</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/crime">crime</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/drug-offences">drug-offences</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/rowville-3178">rowville-3178</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/vic">vic</a>, <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/topic/melbourne-3000">melbourne-3000</a> </p> <p class="published"> First posted <span class="timestamp"> December 18, 2018 14:30:50 </span> </p> <!--noindex--> </div> <br> <br><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-18/jo-lim-ice-driver-sentenced-over-death-of-lisa-di-donato/10630124">Source link </a>

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